domingo, 20 de marzo de 2016

Documentos:The Exacting Eye of Walker Evans. Florence Griswold Museum’s website

A veces, mas veces de lo que parece, se encuentran cosas curiosas sobre fotografía y fotógrafos.

En la web

encontramos una página sobre

The Exacting Eye of Walker Evans

pues bien esta página nos hace un relato sobre la biografía de este conocido fotógrafo americano.

Merece la pena detenerse, no por conocido deja de ser interesante, en el proceso de selección de la foto a publicar entre las varias fotos que un fotógrafo saca de un tema

Sección Compare

Characteristic of his working style, Evans took many photographs of his selected subjects, approaching from different angles or using different cameras. Evans’ exacting eye worked tirelessly to capture the image in the moment, rather than in the darkroom after the fact. In the course of his experimentation, the variations between the shots can sometimes appear subtle. Although we cannot reconstruct all of the complex decisions made by Evans’, both artistic and technical, it is possible to read the variant images in relation to one another, in an effort to see what he saw

...........y recordemos también que

In a final, and widely unknown, photographic campaign, Evans adopted the Polaroid SX-70, a pocket-sized, mass-market camera that produced instant, self-developing prints.

Comparison A

MODEL: In a series of photographs taken of Allie Mae Burroughs, the camera, lens, film, and nearly everything but the model are the same from image to image. The slight variations in Allie Mae’s facial expressions differentiate the photos. In the first image, her expression, while stoic, is somewhat gentle, compared to the second where the tip of her head to one side and the furrow of her brow combine to seem as if she is scrutinizing the viewer. The second image is the one selected for the book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.

Comparison A

MODEL: In a series of photographs taken of Allie Mae Burroughs, the camera, lens, film, and nearly everything but the model are the same from image to image. The slight variations in Allie Mae’s facial expressions differentiate the photos. In the first image, her expression, while stoic, is somewhat gentle, compared to the second where the tip of her head to one side and the furrow of her brow combine to seem as if she is scrutinizing the viewer. The second image is the one selected for the book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.

Comparison A

MODEL: In a series of photographs taken of Allie Mae Burroughs, the camera, lens, film, and nearly everything but the model are the same from image to image. The slight variations in Allie Mae’s facial expressions differentiate the photos. In the first image, her expression, while stoic, is somewhat gentle, compared to the second where the tip of her head to one side and the furrow of her brow combine to seem as if she is scrutinizing the viewer. The second image is the one selected for the book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.

Comparison A

MODEL: In a series of photographs taken of Allie Mae Burroughs, the camera, lens, film, and nearly everything but the model are the same from image to image. The slight variations in Allie Mae’s facial expressions differentiate the photos. In the first image, her expression, while stoic, is somewhat gentle, compared to the second where the tip of her head to one side and the furrow of her brow combine to seem as if she is scrutinizing the viewer. The second image is the one selected for the book Let Us Now Praise Famous Men.